Saturday, January 07, 2006

Secret underwater garden #3


Hippocampus Tristus.

The so-called sad sea horse.

direct digital image

by stuart owen fox 2006

Thursday, January 05, 2006

The secret life of sea horses


Hippocampus tristus' favorite food. Thistles.

There are worse place than this in Copenhagen


Especially if it happens to be raining cats and dogs.

Wednesday, January 04, 2006

Wonderful expression in English ...

Tuesday, January 03, 2006

Thanking Henri Matisse (and China too)

WARNING:YOU ARE ENTERING BOTANICAL TERRITORY- Click on image to enlarge it


The direct digital imaging lab is located in Northern New South Wales, Australia.

Our mission statement is: this is the new era of direct digital imaging.

Our motto is: No cameras. No film. No chemistry.

Our contact point is: labrat@clic.org.au

Your human contact is: Stuart Owen Fox

Method of illustrating is applied physics. The rules were established by Sir Isaac Newton. (The law of the inverse square)
We have simply found a way to apply those rules to a new technology. The result is d.d.i.

Possibly the rarest flower in Australia

Golden Guinea, Northern Australia

Kapok bombax ceiba, Queensland, Australia

Bottlebrush orchid, Cape York, Australia

Joseph Banks & Daniel Solander 1770

Ant Plant, far north Queensland


Ants make nests inside it.

Mango Pine, Cooktown, Queensland, Australia

Batswing

Northern Queensland orchid

In the mangrove swamp

Ginger plant, Australia

Cocky Apple, Australia

Caution: entering d.d.i. botanical zone ahead

Monday, January 02, 2006

Remember when you could remember things?

Cat dreaming of flying

The best and only chance for world peace is ...

Sunday, January 01, 2006

More shameless self promotion

Ulysses butterfly, Australia

"They" are listening all the time

From micro to macro [poster from 2004]

It is of some concern



We won't eat this one.

It might taste like chicken.

But we aren't game to find out.

The life of an artist [to be continued...]

Collaboration Noel Hart #1 CLICK TO ENLARGE IMAGES


During 2005 Noel Hart and I decided to try collaborating on a special project.

We called it "Beneath the Coral Sea."

Noel works with hot glass in Byron Bay, and exhibits his astonishing glass works in some of the top galleries in the U.S.A., Australia, and in other countries.

[Google Noel Hart to find his web site and to learn more about him and his glass art]

From my point of view, working only with d.d.i. [direct digital imaging] opened new possibilities visually, especially with glass. Many of these images have been scanned underwater.

The featured fish - in keeping with the Great Barrier Reef theme - originate from the coral reefs off the East Coast of Australia. However, these fish were obtained from an aquarium in Cairns. All of these fish died of natural causes prior to obtaining them frozen [dead frozen, actually] from the aquarium. They appear to be alive. That is the 'art' of what we are doing.

To learn more about how the images were done technically go to Google, and type in Goldendolphin. That is the site of Dr. Walter Starck, marine biologist now living in Townsville, Queensland.

Golden Dolphin published a CD-ROM in 2005. It is one of a series of remarkable works done by Dr. Starck. In Issue #24 of December 2005 is a feature article that explains the technical methods used to create this image sereies with Noel Hart.

Incidentally, these frozen dead fish featured in the Australian Pavilion at World Expo 2005 in Japan in another digital format.
During my career I have focused on cultural exchanges between nations. My first exhibition at a World Expo was in 1970, and I have worked on about 20 different World Expo's in the U.S.A., Canada, Japan, Spain, Germany, etc.

--Stuart Owen Fox
d.d.i. lab,
Mullumbimby
email> labrat@clic.org.au

Collaboration Noel Hart #2

Collaboration Noel Hart #3

Collaboration Noel Hart #4

Collaboration Noel Hart #5

Collaboration Noel Hart #6

Collaboration Noel Hart #7

Collaboration Noel Hart #8

Collaboration Noel Hart #9

Collaboration Noel Hart #10

Collaboration Noel Hart #11

Collaboration Noel Hart #13

Collaboration Noel Hart #12

Collaboration Noel Hart #14

Collaboration Noel Hart #15

Collaboration with artist Karma Phuntsok #1


Karma Phuntsok is a Tibetan. He became [unwillingly] a refugee from his country when it was invaded by a much larger neighbor. As a small boy he was taken over the Himalaya Mountains to Nepal by his parents.

In Nepal Karma studied classical Tibetian Buddhist art. While living in Nepal he met [and later married] Carol, an American visiting Nepal. Eventually, they migrated together to Australia. Today they live on an isolated property at Green Pigeon, located in North Eastern New South Wales. They have one son.

Karma's new art has fused with ideas from the West. He admires Salvadore Dali, among others.

In recent years Karma has had successful exhibitions in Miami, Seattle, Sydney, and many other places. His artworks are rare and special, something not often experienced as a blending of Eastern and Western cultural ideas.

Karma's paintings have been published in numerous books and magazines, and on posters and cards.

Google his name to find his web site and learn more about this remarkable artist.

In the following direct digital images [made without a camera] we have melded modern Western science, technology and art and his classical Buddhist ideas into something that is rather unusual and perhaps thought provoking.

-Stuart Owen Fox,
d.d.i. lab
Mullumbimby 01/01/2006

Collaboration with artist Karma Phuntsok #2

Collaboration with artist Karma Phuntsok #3

Collaboration with artist Karma Phuntsok #4

Collaboration with artist Karma Phuntsok #5

Collaboration with artist Karma Phuntsok #6

Collaboration with artist Karma Phuntsok #7